A coeducational day school serving students JK-12


Eleannor Maajid is Latin's Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. She will explain more about the institutional goals for diversity, equity and inclusion. 

How did Latin come up with the goals?

Based on all of the feedback that Latin received, in addition to the climate assessment that was taken in the spring of 2020, we took all that data and we were able to put the goals in five different categories. There's the category of representation, accountability, professional development, education, inclusion and curriculum. As we go through these goals, you will see things that you will think, “Oh, well, I thought they were already doing that. Or how could they not have been doing that already?” I just want you to know that this is something that these are goals that are, there are some ongoing goals that we've always been working on, and that we recognize from all the information that we've been given that we need to spend more time really focusing in on these goals because we do need to do better in these areas. You're going to see some things that you may be surprised to see, or that you may have questions about. And again, we are open to feedback if you have it.

Goal - Representation: Hire and retain more faculty and staff of color.

The first goal is in the representation bucket, which is around hiring and retaining more faculty and staff of color. When I think about hiring or retaining more faculty and staff of color or we do need to do a better job of hiring and also retaining our faculty and staff of color. We're at about 22% faculty and staff of color. And we have about 39% students of color throughout the school. It is our goal to increase the number of faculty and staff of color. One of the ways that we can do that is by conducting implicit bias training for everyone who is involved in our hiring process and having everyone have the same goals around hiring, the same understandings around hiring and why we hire the way that we do and what kinds of things we need to question about our processes. We are going to work with department chairs, staff directors, senior administrators, etc., to work on implicit bias training. We also want to review the places where we actually receive our resumes and our potential leads for teachers and staff. Because sometimes those talent equity acquisition sources don't always have the representation that we're looking for around faculty and staff of color. Based on the climate assessment data, you'll see here that there was a expressed need for more Asian teachers in the lower school. And then in the climate assessment, again, more expressed needs for Black and Latino teachers in the middle and upper school. We also want to continue evaluating and create additional internal support structures to retain faculty and staff of color. So not only is hiring important, but retention is important as well. And our current faculty and staff of color, are going to be essential in that process, accountability.

Goal - Accountability: Create a culture of accountability for racist and discriminatory behavior.

This is one of them I mentioned earlier about the students who were part of demanding accountability. This is the place where so many of their goals came from. Their demands came from around accountability, right? So creating that culture for accountability, for racist and discriminatory behavior. We have done that in many ways. We've actually kind of started some of that process already with the implementation of the bias incident reporting in the middle and the upper school. And we have found, and we have started to have conversations around introducing restorative justice practices, which feels like the right collaboration between the incidents of bias reporting and the restorative justice practices. That feels like a good way to bring that educational piece into our community. And so we are making efforts in those ways as well. And then making sure that there are educational pieces for faculty and staff, as well as students and really everyone around the school, because we also recognize that this is not just accountability for our faculty and staff and our students, but it's accountability for everyone in our community.

Goal - Inclusion: Create strategy for improving feelings of inclusion for Black and Latino/Latinx students.

If we're going to create an inclusive space, we have to be better about holding each other and our community members accountable. And then also making transparent the policies and practices related to that. So everyone has an understanding of what they should and should not be doing and how we as a school will handle that. We look at inclusion. Here's one that is probably the hardest to measure and the goal that we'll take more creativity and more time and more effort really around creating the strategy for improving feelings, for inclusivity, for Black and Latino, lead next students. This came directly from our climate assessment data. Dr. Derek Gay has already spoken to our faculty and staff, our senior admin team and our board and a part of our parent association. And we'll speak to the rest of the community in December to share the climate assessment results. But in the climate assessment, it was very clear that our black and Latino students were having a very different experience from any of the rest of their peers. And so it's tough to measure inclusion, but we are working with the ways around, and you can see the action steps here, evaluating feedback mechanisms, audit current support structures, and then evaluate the programs and initiatives through those lenses of protecting and incorporating the perspectives of these underrepresented identities. So this is one that, again, it doesn't stop any work that we're doing in any other way, but it does say this is something that we really need to focus on, because this is very important right now in our community professional development and education. You will see you've seen throughout the action steps that there seems to be some kind of professional development, some kind of education in each of our different goals, but it's really important for us to have that as its own bucket, to make sure that we are focusing and giving it the attention it needs.

Goal - Professional Development/Education: Embed DEI work into Latin’s culture by committing resources to programming and education for all constituencies.

So around embedding DEI, work into our culture by committing resources to programming and education for all constituencies. And so we have already been doing this for a number of years, but also ramping up in ways and really tailoring it to what we need right now. And so parents at work with the parent association board of trustees, alumni board is something that we are going to continue to implement and where it's not they're actually implemented and then continue to provide those, the training for our larger parent guardian community. And then the intentional onboarding for new employees parents and guardians and students upon their arrival to Latin. And then we have already started to incorporate DEI professional development for faculty and staff and admin that is embedded into their, their day, like their school day, their workday and we can hope to continue to make that something that is ongoing.

Goal - Curriculum: Examine and adjust curriculum to better reflect/represent/include underrepresented perspectives school wide across all disciplines.

And the last one is curriculum, and that's around examining and adjusting curriculum to better reflect, represent, include underrepresented perspectives. School-wide across all disciplines. This also was a very big theme within the demanding accountability demands. They really, you know, in the classroom, do students feel a connection to what they are learning, are their identities represented in our curriculum and what do we need to do better in order to make sure that happens? And so we adopted teaching tolerance as social justice standards in 2017. But we want to continue to work with our faculty to make sure that is incorporated in a way that is felt by all students. And also that all teachers are able to teach in their classrooms. And then we want to look at our scope and sequence of our diversity equity and inclusion work throughout the curriculum and find out where we need to do more in that way. And maybe, you know, where we need to get more professional development education for our teachers.

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Latin's Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Goals and Actions Steps


Eleannor Maajid is Latin's Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. She will explain more about the institutional goals for diversity, equity and inclusion. 

How did Latin come up with the goals?

Based on all of the feedback that Latin received, in addition to the climate assessment that was taken in the spring of 2020, we took all that data and we were able to put the goals in five different categories. There's the category of representation, accountability, professional development, education, inclusion and curriculum. As we go through these goals, you will see things that you will think, “Oh, well, I thought they were already doing that. Or how could they not have been doing that already?” I just want you to know that this is something that these are goals that are, there are some ongoing goals that we've always been working on, and that we recognize from all the information that we've been given that we need to spend more time really focusing in on these goals because we do need to do better in these areas. You're going to see some things that you may be surprised to see, or that you may have questions about. And again, we are open to feedback if you have it.

Goal - Representation: Hire and retain more faculty and staff of color.

The first goal is in the representation bucket, which is around hiring and retaining more faculty and staff of color. When I think about hiring or retaining more faculty and staff of color or we do need to do a better job of hiring and also retaining our faculty and staff of color. We're at about 22% faculty and staff of color. And we have about 39% students of color throughout the school. It is our goal to increase the number of faculty and staff of color. One of the ways that we can do that is by conducting implicit bias training for everyone who is involved in our hiring process and having everyone have the same goals around hiring, the same understandings around hiring and why we hire the way that we do and what kinds of things we need to question about our processes. We are going to work with department chairs, staff directors, senior administrators, etc., to work on implicit bias training. We also want to review the places where we actually receive our resumes and our potential leads for teachers and staff. Because sometimes those talent equity acquisition sources don't always have the representation that we're looking for around faculty and staff of color. Based on the climate assessment data, you'll see here that there was a expressed need for more Asian teachers in the lower school. And then in the climate assessment, again, more expressed needs for Black and Latino teachers in the middle and upper school. We also want to continue evaluating and create additional internal support structures to retain faculty and staff of color. So not only is hiring important, but retention is important as well. And our current faculty and staff of color, are going to be essential in that process, accountability.

Goal - Accountability: Create a culture of accountability for racist and discriminatory behavior.

This is one of them I mentioned earlier about the students who were part of demanding accountability. This is the place where so many of their goals came from. Their demands came from around accountability, right? So creating that culture for accountability, for racist and discriminatory behavior. We have done that in many ways. We've actually kind of started some of that process already with the implementation of the bias incident reporting in the middle and the upper school. And we have found, and we have started to have conversations around introducing restorative justice practices, which feels like the right collaboration between the incidents of bias reporting and the restorative justice practices. That feels like a good way to bring that educational piece into our community. And so we are making efforts in those ways as well. And then making sure that there are educational pieces for faculty and staff, as well as students and really everyone around the school, because we also recognize that this is not just accountability for our faculty and staff and our students, but it's accountability for everyone in our community.

Goal - Inclusion: Create strategy for improving feelings of inclusion for Black and Latino/Latinx students.

If we're going to create an inclusive space, we have to be better about holding each other and our community members accountable. And then also making transparent the policies and practices related to that. So everyone has an understanding of what they should and should not be doing and how we as a school will handle that. We look at inclusion. Here's one that is probably the hardest to measure and the goal that we'll take more creativity and more time and more effort really around creating the strategy for improving feelings, for inclusivity, for Black and Latino, lead next students. This came directly from our climate assessment data. Dr. Derek Gay has already spoken to our faculty and staff, our senior admin team and our board and a part of our parent association. And we'll speak to the rest of the community in December to share the climate assessment results. But in the climate assessment, it was very clear that our black and Latino students were having a very different experience from any of the rest of their peers. And so it's tough to measure inclusion, but we are working with the ways around, and you can see the action steps here, evaluating feedback mechanisms, audit current support structures, and then evaluate the programs and initiatives through those lenses of protecting and incorporating the perspectives of these underrepresented identities. So this is one that, again, it doesn't stop any work that we're doing in any other way, but it does say this is something that we really need to focus on, because this is very important right now in our community professional development and education. You will see you've seen throughout the action steps that there seems to be some kind of professional development, some kind of education in each of our different goals, but it's really important for us to have that as its own bucket, to make sure that we are focusing and giving it the attention it needs.

Goal - Professional Development/Education: Embed DEI work into Latin’s culture by committing resources to programming and education for all constituencies.

So around embedding DEI, work into our culture by committing resources to programming and education for all constituencies. And so we have already been doing this for a number of years, but also ramping up in ways and really tailoring it to what we need right now. And so parents at work with the parent association board of trustees, alumni board is something that we are going to continue to implement and where it's not they're actually implemented and then continue to provide those, the training for our larger parent guardian community. And then the intentional onboarding for new employees parents and guardians and students upon their arrival to Latin. And then we have already started to incorporate DEI professional development for faculty and staff and admin that is embedded into their, their day, like their school day, their workday and we can hope to continue to make that something that is ongoing.

Goal - Curriculum: Examine and adjust curriculum to better reflect/represent/include underrepresented perspectives school wide across all disciplines.

And the last one is curriculum, and that's around examining and adjusting curriculum to better reflect, represent, include underrepresented perspectives. School-wide across all disciplines. This also was a very big theme within the demanding accountability demands. They really, you know, in the classroom, do students feel a connection to what they are learning, are their identities represented in our curriculum and what do we need to do better in order to make sure that happens? And so we adopted teaching tolerance as social justice standards in 2017. But we want to continue to work with our faculty to make sure that is incorporated in a way that is felt by all students. And also that all teachers are able to teach in their classrooms. And then we want to look at our scope and sequence of our diversity equity and inclusion work throughout the curriculum and find out where we need to do more in that way. And maybe, you know, where we need to get more professional development education for our teachers.

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Explore Our News & Stories

Fourth grader's poem on social issues

One of the fourth grade classrooms passionately discussed social issues and the impact they have on our world. These lessons stemmed from their yearlong unpacking of identities and coming together as a classroom community. 

In the spring, fourth graders participated in the opinion writing unit, which focuses on understanding how to take a stand, set a clear thesis statement, give supporting reasons, and back up their thinking with evidence.

The first project in this unit was for students to create social issues acrostic poems, where certain letters in each line spell out a word or phrase. This assignment helped students to think about issues going on in their world. They generated their own list and discussed what each issue means and means to them.

Fourth grade's list of important social issues

A list of important social issues generated by a fourth grade classroom with the help of fourth grade teacher Amanda Schirmacher, assistant teacher Ada Tan and support staff teacher Endia Moore.

These conversations were also supplemented with books as well. The issues they chose for their poems were ones that they felt strongly about in this moment–many about animals, as the 9- and 10-year-old brains adore their animals!

Students were pleased to show off their work to a very special visitor, Head of School Randall Dunn, during their classroom gallery walk.

Randall Dunn at fourth grade gallery walk

Head of School Randall Dunn visits the fourth grade's gallery walk.

Then the students dove deeper into the social issues and identified one that they care deeply about, researched the issues, and then wrote a five-paragraph essay on the issue. 

To view more of the students' acrostic poems, browse the photo gallery below.


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National Association of Independent Schools logo

Congratulations to Head of School Randall Dunn for being named Chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)--a nonprofit membership association that provides services to more than 1,900 schools and associations of schools in the United States and abroad, including more than 1,600 independent private K-12 schools in the U.S.

This appointment follows Randall’s three years of service in the role of Vice Chair and will be a continuation of his nine years of service on the board so far. As Chair, Randall will assume We all take away more than we give. NAIS and the experience on the board allows us to lead and enhance our own schools with a greater perspective and to serve as ambassadors for the value and relevance of independent schools as whole.
Randall Dunn, Head of School at Latin School of Chicago and Board Chair of NAIS
oversight of the board as they collaborate closely with Donna Orem, president of NAIS to forward the vision and mission of the organization, which is to “...co-create the future of education by uniting and empowering our community through thought leadership, research, creation and curation of resources, and direct collaboration with education leaders.”

Randall views this volunteer role as an important learning opportunity for him--and the other trustees. “We all take away more than we give. NAIS and the experience on the board allows us to lead and enhance our own schools with a greater perspective and to serve as ambassadors for the value and relevance of independent schools as whole.” 

In addition, Randall’s leadership role keeps Latin at the forefront of the most important information and trends impacting our students.  

Read more about Randall's appointment in an article published by The Forum, Latin's student-run news publication.

Congratulations, Randall! 

See the full NAIS Board here.  

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Middle school student and a teacher at Origami Club

Middle school students participated in in-person clubs for the first time this year–and they had a blast! With the gorgeous spring weather, the students even got outside for knitting club. Check out the knitting club and origami club!

 
 
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Upper school student athletes on Signing Day

We are so proud of our student-athletes who have committed to playing a sport in college next year!

Eli A. will be playing baseball at Denison University; Peter B. will be running cross country and track at Kenyon College; Molly C. will be on the equestrian team Baylor University; Colin C. will be playing soccer at Wesleyan University; and Blake D. playing golf and ice hockey at The University of Tampa.

Cole F. will be playing soccer and track at Oberlin College; Sujan G. will be playing tennis at Bowdoin University; Anees G. will be playing tennis at New York University; Natalie M. will be playing basketball at Johns Hopkins University; Marianne M. will be running track at Harvard University; Charlie M. will be rowing at Loyola Marymount University; and Bea P. will be running cross country and track at Middlebury College.

Noah R. will be running track at Lewis and Clark College; Ashley R. will be swimming at Carleton College; Matthew S. will be playing baseball at Bates College; Olivia S. will be running cross country and track at The George Washington University; and Ava T. will be playing volleyball at The University of Arizona. Congratulations to our student-athletes!

Go Romans!

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