A coeducational day school serving students JK-12

The end result of the drawing project is a photograph of the students’ hands covered with hand-drawn simple or elaborate patterns and words that reflect their hopes and fears. In order to get to this final product, ninth graders studied a series of artistic methods and artists to better understand identity expression through art.

Early in the semester, the students examined lines as a means of expression: Smooth lines are more calming, while jagged lines can imply agitation or stress. They connected this with early cave painting, as early art was expressive mark-making with symbols and simplified representations of everyday objects. Another artistic method the students engaged with was Zentangle designs, otherwise known as drawings of structured patterns. Zentangles urge the mind to draw freely and let lines and shapes emerge unintentionally. Then students were inspired by the work of African artist Laolu Senbanjo, who worked with patterns and simple line drawings to make art on objects. He then connected his work with tattoo art (as he had seen on his grandmother) by painting on the arms and faces of people.

After this research, the class reflected on their hopes and fears by finding images to support each one. GSVA students then partnered up to share these ideas and photographed one another’s hands against a background. The photos were printed out, and students used words, icons, expressive lines and patterns to dramatize and embellish one hand as hope and another to represent fear.

Arts

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Handwritten Drawings

Hopes and fears. We all have them. Ninth grade students in the Global Studies Visual Arts (GSVA) classes learned to use art as a form of expressing them.

The end result of the drawing project is a photograph of the students’ hands covered with hand-drawn simple or elaborate patterns and words that reflect their hopes and fears. In order to get to this final product, ninth graders studied a series of artistic methods and artists to better understand identity expression through art.

Early in the semester, the students examined lines as a means of expression: Smooth lines are more calming, while jagged lines can imply agitation or stress. They connected this with early cave painting, as early art was expressive mark-making with symbols and simplified representations of everyday objects. Another artistic method the students engaged with was Zentangle designs, otherwise known as drawings of structured patterns. Zentangles urge the mind to draw freely and let lines and shapes emerge unintentionally. Then students were inspired by the work of African artist Laolu Senbanjo, who worked with patterns and simple line drawings to make art on objects. He then connected his work with tattoo art (as he had seen on his grandmother) by painting on the arms and faces of people.

After this research, the class reflected on their hopes and fears by finding images to support each one. GSVA students then partnered up to share these ideas and photographed one another’s hands against a background. The photos were printed out, and students used words, icons, expressive lines and patterns to dramatize and embellish one hand as hope and another to represent fear.

Arts

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Alice Baumgartner '06, a historian at the University of Southern California and author of "South to Freedom: Runaway Slaves to Mexico and the Road to the Civil War," was recently interviewed on NPR's "All Things Considered" for a story titled "A Chapter In U.S. History Often Ignored: The Flight Of Runaway Slaves To Mexico." Listen to the 13-minute interview or read the article. 

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Lower school students looking at a computer

In a world where students are spending a significant part of their school day online, it is now more important than ever to develop thoughtful and empathetic digital citizens from a young age. 

Fourth grade students are studying what it means to be a considerate digital citizen and maintain a positive digital footprint with Fiona Deeney, Latin’s lower school computer science and technology integration specialist. A digital citizen is someone who develops skills to responsibly use technology, including digital devices and online media platforms. When individuals share information online, they leave a digital footprint. A digital citizen is someone who develops skills to responsibly use technology, including digital devices and online media platforms.

After the students learned the basics of online safety and digital footprints, they were tasked with creating a graphic that encompassed these lessons. In order to complete the assignment, they researched a credible digital media platform to build their piece–Pic Collage was a popular option among the students.

Hear more about what it means to be a responsible digital citizen and how to manage a digital footprint from fourth grade students Colleen C. ’29 and Annabelle W. ’29.

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Jessie Heider

Get to know Jessie Heider who has been Latin's partner from Athletico and athletic trainer since 2010. In January, Jessie officially became the first full-time in-house athletic trainer at Latin. 

Education 

B.S. in Athletic Training - Purdue University
M.S. in Health Education & Promotion - University of Cincinnati

Position and years at Latin

Athletic Trainer - 10 years

Favorite Quote: 

"Today me will live in the moment, unless it's unpleasant, in which case me will eat a cookie." –Cookie Monster

What are your favorite things about Latin? 

There is such a close sense of community at Latin. One of my favorite things about working here is being able to connect with and get to know so many different people.

What are the best parts of your job? 

It’s rewarding to help kids through the rehabilitation process and then get to see them successfully return to their sport after experiencing an injury. I also love that every workday is different… it keeps me on my toes!

Why did you decide that you wanted to work at a school? 

I always found the idea of working at a school appealing because I knew it would give me the opportunity to be involved in so much more than just athletics. At Latin, I’m lucky enough to work with both athletics and our Latin 360 program. It’s also fun to be able to support our students in other ways, such as helping with senior projects or attending dance shows and plays.

What was the last good book you read? 

"American Dirt" by Jeanine Cummins

What are your hobbies and interests? 

I love spending time with my dog, Piper, playing fantasy football and following Purdue sports (Boiler Up!). I’m also excited to get back to traveling again once the pandemic is over.

What was your first job?

I worked as an Athletic Trainer for Women’s Lacrosse at the University of Cincinnati while in grad school, but working at Latin was my first “official” job after finishing school.

What’s your favorite place you’ve ever visited? 

Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada

What's the best advice you've ever heard?

Be present. Try not to focus on what happened in the past or what will happen in the future. Enjoy the “now.”

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US Chess Team  in the Learning Commons during the State Final

On February 12-13, the upper school chess team competed virtually in the Illinois High School Association (IHSA) state finals and finished in first place in Division 1A.
The students who represented Latin were Waleed B. '21, Matthew S. '21, Mark M. '21, William F. '21, Eli E. '23, Anton S. '23, Collin D. '22, and Maxwell L. '23. The tournament took place online, but participating teams had to play from the same location—the Romans competed from the upper school's Learning Commons. This is the first time in Latin history that the Romans have won the division title.

ABOUT THE UPPER SCHOOL CHESS TEAM: This academic team meets four times a week for practice and competes in the Chicago Chess Conference composed of catholic schools, including St. Ignatius, St. Patrick, De La Salle, Marist, Br. Rice, etc. After the conference play, they compete in sectionals. Then if they qualify, they play in the state championships.  

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